Up and Under Group

Legislation Update – New driving laws

Just a heads up on the new driving offences and increased that have recently come into force. 

“What do the new laws cover?
Many of the offences are covered by laws that already exist, but have been hard to enforce because police had to go through the courts. Now police can issue an on-the-spot fine, handed to you on the road, so it’ll be easier for them to do so.

The standard fine for a number of offences has gone up, including:

  • Speeding
  • Using a mobile phone while driving
  • Driving on the hard shoulder
  • Ignoring traffic directions

And 2 new bits of ‘careless driving’ have been made an offence:

  • Tailgating
  • Lane-hogging, usually in the middle lane

What is tailgating and lane-hogging?
Many drivers might be familiar with these things without necessarily knowing what they’re called.

  • Tailgating – This is when someone drives too close to the car in front. It’s usually done by drivers trying to force the car in front to move faster or to change lanes.
  • Lane-hogging – Many drivers use the middle lane as a ‘cruising lane’ and drive too slowly. This is dangerous and can force cars to slow down quickly. “

 Source: Post Office web site

Which existing fines are going up?


Offences include Was Now
Source: Department of Transport
Non-endorsable fixed penalty notice (where the driver does not receive points on their licence) Failing to give way, obscuring registration number, stopping on the hard shoulder, misuse of headlights, sounding horn at night

£30 £50
 Endorsable fixed penalty notice (points issued) Using a mobile while driving, speeding, reversing on a motorway, not stopping at a red light

£60 £100
 Non-endorsable fixed penalty notice Failure to display tax disc, not wearing a seat belt when driving, driving without an MoT certificate

£60 £100
Endorsable fixed penalty notice offence Failure to identify driver

£120 £200
Endorsable fixed penalty notice offence Driving without third party insurance £200 £300
This entry was posted in Driving, legislation, Safety.

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